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Date: Sun, 23 Aug 1998 22:24:30 GMT
From: <email address> (Michael J. Cross)
Subject: MV1389: Beside Us There Is ...

.. all sorts of things.

Here's my contribution to the 'Musical Alphabet' thread.

*If* everything was filed alphabetically, then PA/CJ would be 
surrounded by: The Art of Noise, Arzachel (Steve Hillage & Dave 
Stewart in their very early days), The Association, Virginia Astley, 
Atomic Rooster, Audience, Autosalvage, Kevin Ayers.

But in fact, the LP's are surrounded by Erroll Garner, Keith Jarrett,
John Klemmer, Stanley Jordan, Milcho Leviev Quartet, Thelonius Monk -
because they are physically easy to get at there.

The CD's are amongst some relatively recent arrivals: Help Yourself
(at last a CD re-issue), King Crimson, Egg, Jason Rebello, Moondog,
Man, Rain Parade, The Bevis Frond.

all the best,
-- 
 Michael J. Cross    BSFA Magazine Index at http://www.mjckeh.demon.co.uk
    "Beware of the Beautiful Stranger/Driving Through Mythical America"
       by Pete Atkin & Clive James, CD reissue 11/97 on See For Miles
   For more info on all PA/CJ releases, see http://www.rwt.co.uk/pa.htm

==============================================================================
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 1998 23:58:01 +0100
From: Pete Smith <email address>
Subject: MV1390 Re: MV1351; MV1346: Contentious?

In message <email address>,
Midnight Voices <email address> writes
>As for his lack of commercial success, can anyone think of a lyricist as good
>or better than Clive who has had any commercial success since the arrival of
>Rock

>Ian C

How about Elvis Costello?
-- 
Pete Smith

==============================================================================
From: Ian Chippett <email address>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 1998 09:43:33 EDT
Subject: MV1391 Re : MV1390; MV1351; MV1346: Contentious?

<< How about Elvis Costello >>

I don't think he's (a) as good or (b) better than Clive James as a lyricist. I
only know his first album at all well which I like a lot but he's the kind of
lyricist (a bit like Dylan and Becker/Fagen, it seems to me) who could have
done something lasting if he'd stopped indulging himself in wilful obscurity.
Oh, and when I wondered whether anyone as good or better than CJ had had any
commercial success, I could have added "or had any commercial failure." No
matter where we look, lyricwise, we find crap or its derivatives. Depressing,
really.

Ian C 

==============================================================================
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 1998 17:45:25 +0800
From: John Fuery <email address>
Subject: MV1392: CONTENTIOUS

Re: CONTENTIOUS


Dear All,

Whilst I was trawling though the Q site the other day, I looked up
Pete in their Review section  "Over 16,000 albums reviewed and
rated!" Or in the case of the THAM collection of the early 90s 
"reviewed and slated".

The attached review is as written on the site by the rather unpleasant
Monty Smith, perhaps the least capable and successful of the CSM/Nick
Kent era NME hacks. I think he eventually went off  to 
work for TV Times where his critical faculties doubtless found their
true level.

Any way, here, without further ado, is Monty's  undated - review

_____________________________________________________________________
The Clive James AMPERSAND (sic) Pete Atkin Songbook 1967 '84:
Touch Has A Memory

Doubtless as civilized and sophisticated as the Broadway songwriters
they so admire, Pete Atkin and Clive James made a number of perfectly
formed folk-jazz-blues records that someone in an Islington basement
flat revered above reason. Their record company was patient but, as
Clive recalls without rancour in the liner notes, Val Doonican's cover
version of The Flowers and The Wine made more money than all their 
other efforts put together. They called it a day in 1974 (sic), for 
Pete to sing his songs when asked and Clive to duet unbidden each
New Year's Eve with the likes of Kylie Minogue and Luciano Pavorotti.
Clive, of course, was the wordsmith, Pete the piano player (and
vocalist, composer (sic) and guitarist). They met as students at
Cambridge and this highly crafted 70-minute compilation is full of
doleful melodies and meaningful lyrics from five of their albums.
Driving Through Mythical America seems to be the favourite with
five tracks. There's also an unconvincing attempt to rock and indeed
roll, I See The Joker, released as a single in 1974. They weren't
successful back then, and aren't likely to start a cult now. Pete's
voice is unvaryingly declamatory and Clive's contrived lyrics are
grimly poetic. Dull stuff, though perhaps not so bad that it deserves
to have been unavailable these past 10 years. 

Q RATING - * *
Reviewed BY: Monty Smith 

BUY IT NOW! (Seriously it said that, so I tried, and alas couldn't.
_______________________________________________________________________

Oddly enough, of the five or so people I've passed tapes of 
BOTBS/DTMA onto, no less than three of them (all good personal
friends of otherwise impeccable musical taste) echo the above
review in saying that the music is "too tin-pan-alleyish". 
The other two people (non friends, but influentials in that
they may be able to spread PA/CJ's music to a wider audience) 
have been the guy who runs the folk show on the local radio 
station who passed no judgements but made a vague promise to 
play a few tracks on his show when he returned from his two 
month holiday in an e-mail I forwarded onto the group about 
6 weeks ago. From the organizer of the HK Folk Festival, not 
a dicky bird (he probably had a finger in one ear and didn't
hear the package land on his mat the day the postman called)

Since I don't post that often, here's another couple of 
queries:

Re alphabet soup: how come no-one out there seems to have
any Phoebe Snow albums/CDs? Her first, self-titled album
was brilliant, her second only slightly less so.

Re underrated singer/songwriter/lyricists, how come no one
has ever mentioned the wonderful and very under-rated 
Warren Zevon? (I bet Ian Chippett hates him!) 

Re the re-release of AKAN/TROS; any news yet? And also
(there I've broken two grammatical commandments in one go!) 
the forthcoming(?) seventh album.

Sorry I can't make Buxton. See if you can get Pete to play
"Between Us There Is Nothing" for me. Hope that it's a sell
out, you all have a wonderful evening and Monty Smith doesn't
take a wrong turning on the M6, A1 (or whatever) 

Yours from recession hit Asia

JOHN FUERY

==============================================================================
From: Ian Chippett <email address>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 1998 11:37:54 EDT
Subject: MV1393 Re : MV1392: CONTENTIOUS

<< Re underrated singer/songwriter/lyricists, how come no one
 has ever mentioned the wonderful and very under-rated 
 Warren Zevon? (I bet Ian Chippett hates him!)  >>

No, I don't. I don't hate anybody  I once saw WZ on the telly and was
favourably impressed by WZ's cynical wit but I regrettably never followed
things up. What should I listen to first? Sorry for being off-topic.

Ian C

==============================================================================
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 1998 19:14:55 +0100
From: Pete Smith <email address>
Subject: MV1394 Re: MV1391; MV1390; MV1351; MV1346: Contentious?

><< How about Elvis Costello >>
>
>I
>only know his first album at all well

>he's the kind of
>lyricist (a bit like Dylan and Becker/Fagen, it seems to me) who could have
>done something lasting if he'd stopped indulging himself in wilful obscurity.

There's a lot more of Elvis after the first album; 20 years' worth.

And as for wilful obscurity, there aren't many who can beat Clive at that game
when he's really going for it.
 
Pete Smith

==============================================================================
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 1998 19:55:27 +0100
From: S J Birkill <email address>
Subject: MV1395: Thoughts from Pete

Pete Atkin writes (swiftly, this morning, before boarding the train for his
Buxton planning session over a Japanese lunch with Clive):

Ian C's observation about fades is interesting. Maybe it'll yet throw up
some further thoughts. I think it's true to say that I always resisted
ending with a fadeout - it so often seemed (seems) a bit of a copout -
unless it seemed there was a good reason, either musical or emotional.
(Sometimes a definitive ending might even seem wrong - the sort of thing
where in a show you might segue a number into something else.) It'd be
interesting to see how the Vs might either account for them or consider them
a copout. One factual thing, though: AKAN does not fade out....!

The thing about H&G (2+4 syllables vs 3+3) is that I was plain sloppy and
wrong at Monyash (3+3). Clive always, quite rightly, intended it to be
2+4. The E in Geography is long; it's not there just to soften the G, as
it might be in Italian. [Hear the 'correct' version from the Dale House
demos, 
http://www.rwtltd.demon.co.uk/history.ram if you've got RealAudio -- Steve]

I'd no idea Roy Brown had a tape of the Cambridge Folk Festival. As I
remember, it was in the Club Tent and therefore scarcely a major outdoor
performance. I could never persuade Ken Woollard to give me a proper
booking - he didn't think I was really folk! There you go! As a local
Cambridge lad (my brother and my Dad still live well within ten minutes walk
of Cherry Hinton Hall) he indulged me that year to the extent of letting me
have that spot (no fee).

My Old Flame is actually a lovely song, but hardly ever played or sung - not
a classic, great song, but a very superior pop song of its time.  It has the
same kind of sad, yearning, worldly feel as I Don't Stand The Ghost Of A
Chance or Just A Gigolo or Lush Life (which IS a classic, great song).  But
Charlie Parker's version is truly and gloriously transcendental, on the
shortlist for the desert island; he doesn't play the original melody at
all, and I think you'd have to be a particularly knowledgeable and
sophisticated hearer of chord sequences to recognise it hearing it blind,
but the chord sequence is distinctive and challenging (which is no doubt one
reason why he chose to play it) and he recomposes it into something
absolutely sublime. The only sung version I have is from the soundtrack of
a forgotten movie called Belle of the Nineties which I have only because
it's played by the Duke Ellington Orchestra where the singer happens to be
the star of the film, Mae West. She sings it really very well indeed. I
do like playing it on piano, but I've never yet sung it, not in public.

==============================================================================
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 1998 19:55:38 +0100
From: S J Birkill <email address>
Subject: MV1396: Monyash Sleeve Notes

Ian Chippett has now completed his commentary on the Monyash 2 CD set:

http://www.rwt.co.uk/monynote.htm

-- Steve

==============================================================================
From: Ian Chippett <email address>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 1998 16:56:31 EDT
Subject: MV1397: Reasons to smirk

I just read on the more or less Official Randy Newman list (I know Pete and
Clive are or were fans of his and quite rightly so) that they have between 60
and 70 members whereas we have, how many is it, Steve? More than double that? 

This calls for a drink. Cheers!

Ian C

==============================================================================
From: Ian Chippett <email address>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 1998 01:31:05 EDT
Subject: MV1398 Re : MV1394; MV1391; MV1390; MV1351; MV1346: Contentious?

<< And as for wilful obscurity, there aren't many who can beat Clive at that
game
 when he's really going for it.
   >>

Occasionally difficult but not really obscure (except on "the Beautiful
Changes") and never wilfully so. 

I'll be quite happy to give Elvis Costello another go if you can recommend
something suitable. As I said, I enjoyed his first album very much and I was
unable to work for various reasons the day after I saw him on the Stiff Tour
of 1976 or whenever it was.

Ian C 

==============================================================================
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 1998 10:11:09 GMT
From: <email address> (Dr Jeremy Walton. Tel: <phone number>)
Subject: MV1399 Re: MV1398; MV1394; MV1391; MV1390; MV1351; MV1346:  Contentious?

Hi Ian,

>> I'll be quite happy to give Elvis Costello another go if you can recommend
>> something suitable. As I said, I enjoyed his first album very much and I was
>> unable to work for various reasons the day after I saw him on the Stiff Tour
>> of 1976 or whenever it was.

I'd rate EC as one of the top-flight songwriters of the late 70's/early
80's, if the criteria is being able to write songs that "you hum a
phrase from while you walk".  His first four albums all contain
excellent examples of compact, tightly-packed songs bursting with images
of his favourite things (which he said in an interview at the time were
"revenge and guilt").  

My personal favourite is "New lace sleeves" off "Trust", his fifth
album.  I'm not really sure what it's about, but the melody is something
that I think PA would have been proud of.  And "Imperial Bedroom", his
(I think) seventh album, has to be one of the best of all time.  

I lost touch with him around about the mid-80's (I recall the "Blood and
chocolate" album as being particularly disappointing) but have heard one
or two things since then (such as "King of America") which have been
interesting.  A vinyl junkie himself, he specialised in 
unreleased-anywhere-else "B" sides and other tracks (one of the
byproducts of an extremely prolific output), but this has recently been
collected together in his back catalogue, which has been  remastered and
reprogrammed for CD on (I think) the Hannibal label.

Cheers,

Jeremy

==============================================================================
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 1998 10:44:00 GMT
From: <email address> (Dr Jeremy Walton. Tel: <phone number>)
Subject: MV1400 Re: MV1380; MV1372; MV1359: PA/CJ Fairport, rain and records

Hi John,

>> I don't think it's expense, actually - the common factor is the way Cropredy
>> recreates sounds to a crowd that recognises quite how amazingly right
>> it is, and if they don't have all the original musicians Fairport have a nack
>> of being able to fit in round the edges and get it to work. You might 
>> remember the sets with Ian Anderson, and Robert Plant, and Procol Harum, too.

And Steve Harley (special surprise guest in 1989).  But I guess they
also try and mix in younger talent like Sally Barker and Eliza Carthy. 
And (my favourite - if only because we know one of the members very
well) Clarion.  I'd agree with your assessment of the feel of the thing,
though.

>> > I liked Loudon Wainwright as well; it was a shame he
>> > didn't do "Men" - I could have done with that instead of "I wish I was a
>> > lesbian" (nice idea, but went on way too long).
>> 
>> - Didn't he pedantically correct himself, Jeremy? "I wish I *were* a
>> Lesbian"? Nothing quite like it in the PA/CJ canon, I thought. Phew.

Yes, you're right.  I think someone in Fairport must have thought it
hugely funny for them to do this song.  As you say - nothing like it in
the PA/CJ canon - thank God.

Cheers,

Jeremy

==============================================================================
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 1998 16:44:37 +0100
From: S J Birkill <email address>
Subject: MV1401 Re: MV1400; MV1380; MV1372; MV1359: PA/CJ Fairport, rain and records

>Date: Wed, 26 Aug 1998 10:44:00 GMT
>From: <email address> (Dr Jeremy Walton. Tel: <phone number>)
>Subject: Re: MV1380 Re: MV1372; MV1359: PA/CJ Fairport, rain and records
>
[snip]
>>> > I liked Loudon Wainwright as well; it was a shame he
>>> > didn't do "Men" - I could have done with that instead of
>>> > "I wish I was a lesbian" (nice idea, but went on way too long).
>>> 
>>> - Didn't he pedantically correct himself, Jeremy? "I wish I *were* a
>>> Lesbian"? Nothing quite like it in the PA/CJ canon, I thought. Phew.
>
>Yes, you're right.  I think someone in Fairport must have thought it
>hugely funny for them to do this song.  As you say - nothing like it in
>the PA/CJ canon - thank God.
>

Take that as a challenge, Clive?

-- SJB

==============================================================================
From: Ian Chippett <email address>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 1998 17:16:00 EDT
Subject: MV1402 Re : MV1395: Thoughts from Pete

Pete wrote:

<< I think it's true to say that I always resisted
 ending with a fadeout - it so often seemed (seems) a bit of a copout -
 unless it seemed there was a good reason, either musical or emotional.
 (Sometimes a definitive ending might even seem wrong - the sort of thing
 where in a show you might segue a number into something else.) It'd be
 interesting to see how the Vs might either account for them or consider them
 a copout. One factual thing, though: AKAN does not fade out.... >>

A few quick thoughts: the fadeout is a purely pop phenomenon. I can't think of
any earlier music with the doubtful exception of Haydn's Farewell Symphony
which fades out. Even in earlier days of recording, jazz, blues and other
musicians always brought their stuff to some sort of conclusion. In fact, it's
not a musical thing, a part of the song itself, more a production effect since
the song itself must have an ending whatever Pete decides to do on record:
when Pete sings, say, "Driving Through Mythical America" on stage (does he by
the way?) he doesn't, one supposes, back away from the mike when approaching
the last bit. No, he stops somewhere he feels suitable or, at any rate, not
unsuitable. 

However, I think it would be impossible to end "Prince of Aquitaine"
satisfactorily since the last chord of the song itself is the dominant A while
"Rain Wheels" is a circular song and contradicts what I said earlier about
production effects as the effects are actually written into the song.
"Sunrise" has to fade out because of the taunting words at the end. AKAN I
agree doesn't really fade out but the bass drum if that's what it is does.

One minor question: was the feedback at the end of "Hypertension Kid" planned
or was it an accident in the studio?

Ian C

==============================================================================
From: Ian Chippett <email address>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 1998 12:53:58 EDT
Subject: MV1403 Re : MV1401; MV1400; MV1380; MV1372; MV1359: PA/CJ Fairport, 
         rain and reco...

<< "I wish I *were* a
 >>> Lesbian"? Nothing quite like it in the PA/CJ canon, I thought >>

A Queen At Nightfall?

Ian C

==============================================================================
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 1998 22:11:33 +0100
From: John N L Morrison <email address>
Subject: MV1404 Re: Digest: Midnight Voices week 51 (MV1369-1388)

In message <email address>,
Midnight Voices <email address> writes
>There's one thing that I've always thought hampered Pete in his pursuit of
>commercial success, something  that he himself has occasionally mentioned but
>MV's don't seem to refer to much: production values.

I have no problem with BOTBS - the Peter Skellern horns enhance it. But
has anyone noticed how bandwidth-limited "The Road of Silk" (TROS) is?
That was the first album to draw me in (John Peel 20+ years ago), but
the first time I played it I thought the thorn had dropped off my
soundbox...

Pete - what went wrong in the mastering? The sound is so shut in - if
the album is re-issued on CD (as we so fervently hope) can it be opened
up? I'm ssure you didn't mean TROS to sound like that.

-- 
John N L Morrison

==============================================================================
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 1998 09:35:10 +0900
From: MM <email address>
Subject: MV1405: Endings

Great to see Pete's comments on fade-outs, ie. being generally against
them. I've had a half formed opinion for decades that they are an easy
way out in a lot of pop songs, but I've never been able to decide on
what is the definitive way to end a song.

Please excuse lack of technical terms from a musical illiterate, but my
favourite for a rock and roll song is probably the Chuck Berry/Rolling
Stones, "Johnny B Goode" type of finish.

Despite being a long term admirer of Pete Townshend, I always felt that
the end of "Won't Get Fooled Again" - like the end of a symphony but
with guitars - was a bit pretentious, but the alternatives would have
been a Deep Purple type distortion finish or a fade-out.

Folk music doesn't seem to have the same trouble, a song can just finish
with an emphatic guitar chord and it sounds fine. Country & Western is
probably the same, but I try to keep my research in that direction to an
absolute minimum.

While typing this I find that I can't remember how most songs do finish
- even ones I thought I knew well - which probably indicates that most
of them are fade-outs or that it isn't important.

The classical composers obviously had the same decisions to make. I was
listening to some Schubert the other day, and noticed that he seems to
meander slowly into a tune, but make up for it with a huge finish.
Mozart, on the other hand, launches straight into a good bit but his
endings often seem understated. He possibly thought - quite rightly in
my opinion - that he didn't need any fire and brimstone at the end to
dress up his compositions.

Disclaimer - the above classical music comments come from a very small
knowledge base.

Murray McGlew
Country Western Australia (how does Duelling Banjos finish?)

==============================================================================
From: Pete Atkin
Subject: MV1406 Re: MV1402
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 1998 09:07:35 +0100

Sorry to be argumentative, but AKAN itself does NOT fade out, nor does the
bass drum.  It simply and quite deliberately STOPS.  Maybe the fact that
it's at the inside of the LP's groove, where the sound quality is
significantly poorer, contributes to the impression of a fade.

And yes, the ending of Hypertension Kid was planned like that.  In fact I
wanted Chris S to do a whole lot more than he did and make it a more
extended coda of strangeness, but I guess he didn't feel either sufficiently
inspired or comfortable with the idea, and it wasn't possible to spend more
time on it - probably just well.

All the best

Pete

==============================================================================
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 1998 20:50:34 +0100
From: Leslie Moss <email address>
Subject: MV1407: Buxton

Steve, or any other informed person.

Any word on how ticket sales are going for Buxton? Is it the talk of
Derbyshire yet?

Leslie

==============================================================================
From: Don Bowen <email address>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 1998 16:32:33 EDT
Subject: MV1408 Re: MV1405: Endings

I have a theory that songs which fade out are often those which were written
or put together in the studio.
If you're an amateur songwriter like wot I was in my 20's and 30's, you can't
exactly play a song to your friends and, at the end, back gently out of the
room, playing ever more soflty until they can't hear you anymore...
No, you just have to work out a decent flourish and be done with it.
Songs created mainly in the studio don't necessarily have this problem, the
band just keep playing the chorus a few times and the producer can fade it
wherever they (this usage blessed by recent Oxford Dictionary) like.
Pete's songs sound to me as though they were well prepared before he ever
entered the studio - so maybe they add weight to my theory.

Oh, and Murray, 'Duelling Banjoes' finishes with a climactic 'Johnny-B-Goode-
esque' sequence that is wonderfully satisfying given its (deliberately)
uncertain beginning.

And finally, I've always enjoyed the beginning to the Beatles' track "Eight
Days a Week" which actually starts with a fade IN.
Just a thought, but perhaps Pete could begin a song at Buxton in the wings and
walk up to the microphone...

Best wishes,

Don

==============================================================================
From: Ian Chippett <email address>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 1998 16:35:39 EDT
Subject: MV1409 Re : MV1406; MV1402

Pete wrote:

<< 
 Sorry to be argumentative, but AKAN itself does NOT fade out, nor does the
 bass drum.  It simply and quite deliberately STOPS.  Maybe the fact that
 it's at the inside of the LP's groove, where the sound quality is
 significantly poorer, contributes to the impression of a fade.

You want argumentative? We got argumentative! I agree 100% that the song
itself stops but the bass drum, on my copy, if it doesn't fade out, it's as
near as makes no difference. I listened to it again this evening and it goes
"boom-boom" a few times and then the needle lifts with no apparent cut-off
point.  Which raises another question.   Was this track originally intended to
be the last track on side one and if so was the bass drum ending pre-
conceived?
 
 And yes, the ending of Hypertension Kid was planned like that.  In fact I
 wanted Chris S to do a whole lot more than he did and make it a more
 extended coda of strangeness, but I guess he didn't feel either sufficiently
 inspired or comfortable with the idea, and it wasn't possible to spend more
 time on it - probably just well.
  >>

Thanks for the information. Having played this track about 1000 times over the
last few months in the car, it's hard to imagine any other ending. How did
Pete/Chris Spedding manage the metallic crashing sound at the end? It sounds
like more than just guitar feedback.

Ian C

==============================================================================
From: "lynn sheppard" <email address>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 1998 23:02:46 +0000
Subject: MV1410 Re: MV1408; MV1405: Endings

I thought "Duelling Banjoes" ended in trouble!     Lynn 

==============================================================================
From: Dave Jones <email address>
Subject: MV1411 RE: MV1408; MV1405: Endings
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 1998 18:07:11 -0400
Organization: Veramark Technologies Inc.

Well, having nothing better to do with my time
right now, here's a theory.

It's this Darwinian symbiosis thing.  Fade-outs
appeared as music radio hit its stride in the 50s
and 60s.  As fellow Voice and occasional DJ
Graeme Aldous will tell you, myths and legends
abound in the business about what listeners like
and what keeps them listening.  There can be little
doubt that talking over the ending of a song to set
up the next song - or better yet, a commercial! -
is a real hook.  Thus, in the Darwinian sense, there
was a selection potential for songs that were easy
to voice-over at the end.

Now which came first, the voice-over or the fade, is
a question that's hard to answer.  Maybe there was
a song with a long coda that a DJ faded manually, and
a record producer cottoned on to this. Or maybe a
particularly lazy songster created the first fade and
stumbled into the evolutionary niche.  But in any case,
consciously or not, people got the idea that fade-outs
might help in getting air time.

A simple test of this hypothesis would be to compare
songs certain of air time with new hopefuls.  Fade-outs
should abound among the hopefuls, but be less common
among the songs from established hit makers.  Of course
that could be better musicianship at work, but I think it's
been proven here and elsewhere that musicianship has
only a tangential relationship to commercial success.

In this sense the 60's Radio Luxembourg policy of fading
all records after 2 min. 30 sec. could be a viewed as an
attempt at selective breeding of shorter songs, leaving
more time for commercials from the Irish Sweepstakes
and the fellow with the sure-fire pools system (to this
day, I retain the valuable knowledge of how to spell
Keynesham).  Well, it didn't work, and the species
radius luxembourgis became extinct instead.  That's
evolution for you.

Dave Jones
Rambling on in Rochester NY.

==============================================================================
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 1998 00:11:34 +0100
From: S J Birkill <email address>
Subject: MV1412 Re: MV1411; MV1408; MV1405: Endings

At 00:08 28.08.98 +0100, Dave Jones wrote:

>and the fellow with the sure-fire pools system (to this
>day, I retain the valuable knowledge of how to spell
>Keynesham).  

Heck, and I always thought Horace Batchelor spelt Keynsham correctly ;o)

==============================================================================
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 1998 12:15:34 +0100
From: Roy Brown <email address>
Subject: MV1413 Re: MV1411; MV1408; MV1405: Endings

>From: Dave Jones <email address>
>Subject: RE: MV1408 Re: MV1405: Endings
>Date: Thu, 27 Aug 1998 18:07:11 -0400
>
>
>In this sense the 60's Radio Luxembourg policy of fading
>all records after 2 min. 30 sec. could be a viewed as an
>attempt at selective breeding of shorter songs,

Hmm. RL used to fade after the middle eight. We reckoned it was to stop
home taping, so's you couldn't get the whole thing. However, as the last
section was usually a reprise, my brother and I could cobble one
together from two playings on our two tape decks. That, of course, you
*had* to fade...

> leaving
>more time for commercials from the Irish Sweepstakes
>and the fellow with the sure-fire pools system (to this
>day, I retain the valuable knowledge of how to spell
>Keynesham).

Or not! It's K_E_Y_N_S_H_A_M. Should be burned into your brain...
(Anybody got the Bonzos album of the same name, BTW?)

'Friends, my new amazing infra-bore method....'
Makes Tony Blackburn seem almost palatable.

>  Well, it didn't work, and the species
>radius luxembourgis became extinct instead.  That's
>evolution for you.

The BBC had its Third Programme transmitters eight miles from where I
lived, so you could get the Third on a bent pin. Whereas RL needed a
wire strung right down the garden. When transistors came in, I made a
circuit that rectified the RF out there (and there was a *lot* from that
transmitter) and used it to power a two-transistor receiver optimised
for RL. So I never needed batteries. I got a certain satisfaction from
subverting the high-minded BBC to power their low-brow 'rival'.

Roy Brown

Flying over Rochester NY
(if only in an Encarta World Atlas 98 virtual tour).
Handy for Niagara, isn't it?

-- 
Roy Brown               Phone : <phone number>     Fax : <fax number>
Affirm Ltd              Email : <email address>
<postal address>        'Have nothing on your systems that you do not    
                         know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.' 

==============================================================================
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 1998 23:34:53 +0100
From: S J Birkill <email address>
Subject: MV1414: Happy Birthweek Midnight Voices!

Well, it seems to fall to me on this quiet weekend to round off the first
52 weeks, and thus the first year's Digest, if not yet the first year to
the day, of Midnight Voices. MV1 was circulated on Tuesday September 2nd
1997. This will be MV1414.

Weekly members will receive Digest No.52 shortly after this goes through to
the (majority) daily lot. And then I'll complete the update of the Web
archive too -- it's already good to Week 51. I intend then (in the next day
or three) to make 'Year 1' available in ZIPped form on the Website, at a
considerable saving in download time compared to taking them individually
in HTML. You'll need WinZip, PKzip or similar to unzip them.

Welcomes are in order for new members Robert Kirk, William Jutsum, Phil
Triggs, Steve Salt, Ken Caird and Paul Gunningham, bringing our membership
to 154.

If there's anyone out there reading this on the Web, who believes he's (I
don't subscribe to the OED's assimilation of popular but incorrect usages
into the language under the banner of evolution -- the language does
evolve, but until recently if hasn't taken quite that path -- nor am I
being sexist [sorry, Don]) a member, but hasn't been receiving MV posts for
some time, please get in touch. We haven't taken a dislike to you! -- you
may have been deleted from the list after a run of apparently permanently
bounced messages for various reasons, including not notifying us of an
e-mail address change.

Compiling the digests, I couldn't help noticing quite a small number of
names dominating our posts. This nucleus of workers is what keeps MV going,
and it's good to see their fertile minds forever dreaming up new topics for
discussion. But I suppose I'm disappointed to see so many who join us with
fascinating histories of their involvement with Pete and his music, and
questions posed to our existing membership, who then, perhaps through a
lack of encouragement, lapse rapidly into lurk mode. Some of these
eventually tire of the dialogues, and lapse (with an e-mail move) or
resign. If you're thinking of quitting, please try posting again before you
do -- I'm sure there are many fruitful avenues of discussion which could be
established from amongst the silent majority, which would enliven our
group. Go back through the archive and pick up on a topic which just wasn't
answered -- there are quite a few!

http://www.rwt.co.uk/mvindex.htm

A happy anniversary to you all, and here's to Weeks 53 through (as our
American cousins say) 104! And I'll see at least 67 of you (including
partners) at the Midnight Voices Buxton reception, and quite a few more at
the concert!

Steve Birkill

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