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From: Cary <email address>
Date: Sun, 14 Jun 1998 22:40:19 +0000
Subject: MV1159 Re: MV1157: Football - legitamate

It's no good protesting about Football 'cause the more you protest, 
the more you'll end up discussing it!! Thought I'd send this for the 
football lovers and haters - legitimate 'cause it was written by 
Clive James. This is his column from The Observer - 11th June, 1978. 
You did say you didn't want to hear about "the current world cup" 
Ian. 
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Chewing The Sporran

Considering that ancient Athens is crammed with philosophers who 
had nothing to do with their time except sit around thinking up 
words, it's no wonder that the Greeks had a word for it. The word is 
hubris. Once England's hopes of competing in the World Cup had
vanished, it was an understandable case of transferred
nationalism that the English, instantly restyling themselves
the British, should heap Scotland with the burden of national
expectations. But it was hubris to be so confident that Scot-
land would do well. Television, during the past week, has not
been as bad as the Press in pouring scorn on Ally and his
army, but it was at least as bad in the way it built them up
in the first place. The best you can say in mitigation is that
the Scots themselves showed less judgement than anybody.
Anyway, you had your choice of channel on which to
view the unfolding disaster. For the connoisseur of high
drama, the BBC was, as usual, the better bet. The Saturday
afternoon preludes to the Scotland-Peru match were referred
to by Dickie Davies of ITV as 'the build-up to and coverage
of the big one'. Unfortunately Dickie, after announcing the
build-up to and coverage of the big one disappeared from
the screen, resurfacing only to provide links. On the Beeb
Frank Bough was there all the time. ' What a day it must be
to be a Scotsman,' he mused ecstatically. There was no get-
ting rid of him. When Jimmy Hill and the experts showed up,
Frank was right there with them.
Videotape of past triumphs was resurrected, principally in
order to demonstrate a quality known as Scotland's Power in
the Air. There were awed voice-over from the assembled
experts. `Dalglish ... I don't think any player but Dalglish
could have got in there ... I don't think anybody in the
world ... Dalglish.' The experts, referred to by Frank as
`some great characters' were unanimous.
Out in Argentina, David Coleman chimed in, telling us,
with no apparent sense of impending doom, that Ally
MacLeod had described his own goalkeeper as `one of the
best in the World Cup' and his own midfield as `one of the
best in the world'. The tune began changing when the Peruvians, 
one goal down, suddenly revealed an ability to run
faster with the ball than the Scots could run without it. When
Peru levelled, the Scots back home must have been regur-
gitating their haggis.

'We are really watching a fascinating game of football,'
said Frank at half-time. For once he was right. On ITV
Kevin Keegan said: `I think they've got problems.' Referring
to the Peruvians, Paddy Crerand said: `They've frightened
the life out of me.' The charming Andy Gray looked equally
distraught. A disarming trio these, but I craved the madder
music of the Beeb, switching back just in time to hear David
say: `Dalglish, who's so far made little impression.'
After several mentions of the hole in Asa Hartford's heart,
David referred to him as a `whole-hearted player', but man-
aged to get in an apology before the BBC switchboard broke
down completely. David, at least, was on form. So, alas, was
Peru. They saved a penalty-another sporran-chewing mo-
ment for the watching Scots. The second Peruvian goal must
have had them hitting each other with cabers. `Sad the way
this match has drifted away from Scotland,' murmured David.
I suppose there was a Roman commentator saying the same
kind of thing at Cane. `Sad the way this battle has drifted
away from the legions'
'You've got to admit the best team won,' said Keegan on
ITV. `They could have by a lot more.' It was agreed that it
was 'unfortunate that there are so many short players in the
Scottish team'. The mysterious evaporation of Scotland's
Power in the Air was thus explained. Back on the Beeb, Ally
MacLeod bravely spoke to David, regretting his team's 'pure
performance'. There was no point in asking him to be mure (sic)
specific. That it was indeed a pure performance was not to be
ignured (sic).
Two days o( recriminations followed, exacerbated by
Willie Johnson's little blunder with the pills. Willie flew
home to be dressed down by Frank Bough. `You shouldn't be
here at 11, should you? You should be out there playing
World Cup football for Scotland. How do you feel?' But by
now it was time for the build-up to the coverage of an even
bigger one, Scotland v. Iran. Once again hubris was thick on
the ground. Scotland would need to win by a lot of goals if 
they were going to qualify. Some darker voices suggested that
they might win by only a few goals. Only the known -
Cassandras - mad creature with rent garments and tresses in 
disarray - dared to speculate that Scotland might not win at 
all. Scattered thinly in the stands, Scots fans with drooping
dirks and detumescent Tam o' Shanters spent a lot of time
watching Joe Jordan falling over. On ITV, voice-overs
detected `a certain lack of spirit in the Scottish side'. The
Iranians, an amateur squad consisting largely of policemen,
catering officers, hairdressers and interior decorators, should
have been able to lose comfortably, but in the event could not
quite manage it, even after putting a shot through their own
goal.
In the chill aftermath, Andy Gray said that Scotland's.
attitude was wrong. `We in the media,' said Brian Moore,
`didn't help there.' He could say that again. Unfortunately
he didn't, but I hope there will be others to say it again for
him. Just because some of the Scots fans are silly enough to
mortgage their houses is no reason for experienced media-
men to,go so far out on the same limb. In fact it was one of
the Glasgow fans, interviewed in the street, who finally put
the truth in a nutshell. `They should have had the send-off
after they came back.'

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~        
ROCK FOLLIES - The Classic 1970's TV Drama starring 
Julie Covington, Charlotte Cornwell and Rula Lenska. 
Online at:-  http://members.xoom.com/Follies
Pictures,sounds and much more (unofficial site)
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Regards - Cary (like Mary with a 'C' for cat)

==============================================================================
From: Don Bowen <email address>
Date: Sun, 14 Jun 1998 18:14:18 EDT
Subject: MV1160: Oh god, football again

Haven't been able to find mention of a football team in any of Clive's lyrics
yet, but I reckon he must've been a fan of certain football players.
I mean, in 'The Man Who Walked Towards the Music' he mentions '.. the way
Natasha liked the ball...'

Don Bowen
Who would draw one of those smiley faces on its side, but typing this is
quicker.

==============================================================================
From: "andy & lynn" <email address>
Subject: MV1161 Re: MV1159; MV1157: Football - legitamate
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 00:28:31 +0100

But what a goal by Archie Gemmill

It seems to me that music and football have this much in common - they are
both slight but considerable.

Andy

==============================================================================
From: "Murray Francis McGlew" <email address>
Subject: MV1162: Various recent discussion points.
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 09:59:17 +0800

Footballer in Clive's books.

In "Unreliable Memoirs" when Clive is at high school, a player of some
note, named something like Reg Gasnier, went out to have a run with the
school football players.
Clive being a New South Welshman, we are talking about rugby league. I
believe the player went on to be a big star, but being from the west myself
I had never heard of him - we play Australian Rules over here. 
Anyway he pushed Clive's face into the mud while fending off a tackle,
apparently quite a legitimate tactic in rugby, which would at least make
you grateful for wet grounds.

Midnight Voice demograhics.

To say we seem to be mostly middle aged, middle class and "middle brow"
types is probably not as simplistic as it sounds. Baby boomers in western
societies have tended to drift into the middle class anyway whatever their
background, just because of the nature of the post war world. 
Middle aged depends on your definition, but if most people first became
fans 25ish years ago it seems logical enough.
Middlebrow is an expression I would almost guarantee that Clive doesn't
approve of, but I use it to describe people like me who are too smart to
read Harold Robbins or Jackie Collins, but aren't smart enough to read
Tolstoy or Proust.

Women going for hunks or sophisticates.

Great subject to really think deeply about. I've noticed from my own circle
of aquaintances over the years that women tend to pretty much concentrate
on the hunks until their mid 20s then start looking for a long term
relationship with someone who will be a good earner, steady father,
non-alchoholic etc. etc.
I believe there is nothing cynical about this. It is just a subconcious
process that is quite logical.
Men do a similar thing, initially lusting after babes (one of the
Americanisms I like) and then looking to settle down with a woman who they
can talk to.
This is complicated by the fact that there are only so many hunks and
babes, so even at a younger age the non-babes and non-hunks don't miss out
altogether. They get the leftovers. A further complication is that some
hunks and babes are intelligent and nice as well. Don't you hate people
like that?

Clive and Pete have probably got a song about that, I'm not sure as I only
have the re-release albums.

Sorry to go on so long. Finally a question. Some time ago there were
references to the fact that a lot of Pete's songs don't contain a "middle
eight". I was going to keep quiet, but have finally decided to admit my
ignorance. I've no idea what that means, can someone enlighten me?

Murray McGlew.

==============================================================================
From: Ian Chippett <email address>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 01:33:08 EDT
Subject: MV1163 Re : MV1159; MV1157: Football - legitamate

Thanks, Cary. Clive did quite a bit of F***ball reviewing during his time on
the Observer and there are a couple of reviews of the Cup Final in "Visions at
Midnight" at a time when he was supposed to be writing songs with Pete so it
could be said that there is PA content. 
It's also amazing to find that Arsenal and England centre forward Ian Wright
is now a Voice. Pete must be "over the moon." 
I hereby promise not to mention the new dreaded F*** word in future
communications for at least four years.

Ian C

==============================================================================
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 15:02:23 +0100
From: Gerald Smith <email address>
Subject: MV1164 Re: MV1162: Various recent discussion points.

At 07:28 15/06/98 +0100, Murray Francis McGlew wrote:
>
> Finally a question. Some time ago there were 
>references to the fact that a lot of Pete's songs don't contain a "middle
>eight". I was going to keep quiet, but have finally decided to admit my
>ignorance. I've no idea what that means, can someone enlighten me?

	Murray - a middle eight is a short section, typically around eight bars, 
(hence the name) often found in songs as distinct from the verses andchoruses.

	Often, it will be played only once or maybe twice during the whole song, 
may or may not have words and is usually accompanied by a change of key and 
will usually have a 'feel' distinct from the preceeding verse and chorus
material (change of rhythmn, tempo, beat, key, etc). It keeps the listener
interested and can also emphasize a crucial lyric point.

	That's how I see it, anyway.

All the best

Gerry Smith

Gerald Smith's Homepage :
http://web.ukonline.co.uk/gerald.smith/index.htm

==============================================================================
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 23:26:56 +0800 (HKT)
From: Steve Reels <email address>
Subject: MV1165 Re: MV1163; MV1159; MV1157: Football - legitamate

Dear Ian

Just back from the pub, a Hong Kong pub, and quite happy about our
(England's) performance. As a Voice, and an Arsenal supporter, I'm intrigued
by your mail. Is tongue stuffed firmly in cheek? How do you know THE Ian
Wright is a Voice? It seems incredible, and too good to be true too.

Cheers
Steve Reels

==============================================================================
From: <email address>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 12:29:11 EDT
Subject: MV1166: Middle eights

Murray,
An example of a middle eight is the bit in Flowers and the Wine beginning
"When you fix the dates...". Another is "Oh give me a pen and some paper..."
in Have you got a biro I can borrow? It's true that Pete's songs don't have
too many. If my memory serves me well, he once wrote to say that he
occasionally used verses to serve as middle eights i.e. by writing different
music to what was apparently intended by Clive to be another verse. He said
there's an example in Payday Evenings but mentions others which I've never
found. Anyone know where they are?

Ian C

==============================================================================
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 17:38:13 GMT
From: <email address> (Dr Jeremy Walton. Tel: <phone number>)
Subject: MV1167 Re: MV1160: Oh god, football again

Hi Don,

>> Haven't been able to find mention of a football team in any of Clive's lyrics
>> yet, but I reckon he must've been a fan of certain football players.
>> I mean, in 'The Man Who Walked Towards the Music' he mentions '.. the way
>> Natasha liked the ball...'

This one came up a while back - I recall only that there was a theory
going round that "Natasha" was somehow linked to (a nickname of?) Nat
Lofthouse, the legendary (I think) Newcastle United forward. The idea
of him "loving the (his?) ball(s?)" was more than a little diverting.

But eventually Clive put us all out of our misery by confirming that
the reference was indeed to Natasha in "War and Peace" - a text which
has absolutely nothing to do with you-know-what-ball at all.

Cheers,

Jeremy

==============================================================================
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 17:45:39 GMT
From: <email address> (Dr Jeremy Walton. Tel: <phone number>)
Subject: MV1168 Re: MV1154: Pete sings .........

Hi Pete,

>> Deacon Blues (Becker and Fagen - Aja)
>> 
>> My Old School (Becker & Fagen from Countdown To Ecstasy - I also sing Razor
>> Boy a lot, but I don't think I've ever done it in public - likewise Fire In
>> the Hole)

A collection of fine songs, from two peerless writers, I think.  I can
picture you doing a great job on midtempo ballads like "Razor Boy" and 
"Deacon Blues".  Any chance of these being revived in concert?  Or does
it just depend on what mood we're all in?  After all, "I play just what
I feel".

Cheers,

Jeremy

==============================================================================
From: Dave Jones <email address>
Subject: MV1169 RE: MV1168; MV1154: Pete sings .........
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 13:47:27 -0400

>> Deacon Blues (Becker and Fagen - Aja)
>> 
I'd be interested to know if Pete felt the need to
translate the line "They call Alabama the Crimson Tide".

The reference, dear readers, is not to the state or its
hydrography, but to the (American) football team of
the University of Alabama.

Dave Jones
Caught offside in Rochester NY.

==============================================================================
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 21:04:06 +0100
From: Leslie Moss <email address>
Subject: MV1170 Re: MV1168; MV1154: Pete sings .........

At 18:14 15/06/98 +0100, you wrote:
>Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 17:45:39 GMT
>From: <email address> (Dr Jeremy Walton. <phone number>) 

>A collection of fine songs, from two peerless writers, I think.  I can
>picture you doing a great job on midtempo ballads like "Razor Boy" and 
>"Deacon Blues".  Any chance of these being revived in concert?  Or does
>it just depend on what mood we're all in?  After all, "I play just what

One of my great pleasures of 1997 was meeting Pete at Steve and Carole's the
night before Monyash, and listening to him performing on the Clavinova not
just his own music but also a selection of Becker/Fagen numbers including
Deacon Blues and a couple from Donald Fagen's solo album The Nightfly. I was
delighted to find a link between two of my musical loves and Pete performing
them solo added a new dimension to the much-listened to songs.

I'd be delighted to hear Pete perform B/F or indeed other artists' music at
Buxton.

Drooling at the bit in anticipation (if you'll forgive the mixed metaphors!).

Leslie

==============================================================================
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 21:41:33 +0100
From: John N L Morrison <email address>
Subject: MV1171 Re: Digest: Midnight Voices week 41 (MV1118-1158)

>
>In the Steve Wright interview just before Christmas, Clive mentions a desire
>to write more songs with Pete. Does this mean there may be an eighth album
>(of new stuff) in the offing? 
>
>If so: excellent!
>
>All the best,
>
>Richard C.

Which suggests the tiny band of Midnight Voices need a strategy to
ensure a continued supply of our drug (well, what else - why would we
youngsters and oldsters behave like this otherwise?). So, a multi-point
plan:

1) Widen the circle - encourage others to enjoy P&C (I'm bringing
friends to Buxton who saw Pete & Clive live once on a magical evening 20
years ago)

2) Find work for Pete (weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, stag nights, sideboards,
clothespegs - whatever).

3) 7th album; hire some good session musicians, sweep up all the
outstanding songs. BUT:

4) Move on. Pete and Clive, if you read this, think what you will be
remembered for. Not the chat shows, the postcards, the worthy career in
BBC West and carpentry, the New Year's Eve charivari - it will be the
songs and lyrics you created together. Where else would you find the
enthusiasm generated by the Midnight Voices some 20 years later from
people who appreciated - and still appreciate - what you created. Have
your juices run so dry? I seem to recall Clive saying many years ago
that the lyrical muse deserted him suddenly one day and never returned -
is she still absent? Now that you have reached a degree of maturity (you
and I are the same age, but my sons know and can play all your songs),
have the juices run so dry? Or are there still some ideas - I have
remembered "Canoe" down the years since that night at the Shaw Theatre -
some ideas that can still be expressed in words and music? If we are not
to be stifled by stale reprises, then:

5) The 8th album. Your new songs. For all of us.
-- 
John N L Morrison

==============================================================================
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 1998 14:31:41 +0100
From: Carole Birkill <email address>
Subject: MV1172: MV Reception

Just a quick reminder to anyone who wants tickets for the reception and has
not yet ordered them to please do so. There are tickets still available, it
just makes it easier for us if all the orders come in fairly fast and we
can get the tickets sent out and then forget about that aspect for the time
being. 

Having said that, Ticket Man does not finish exams until tomorrow and is
beetling off to Canada for three weeks on the 23rd to see Neil (Lovelock)
so we will have to speak nicely to him so we can have them before he goes.
We will not pay in any cheques until the tickets go out.

All is going according to plan with Buxton OH. We are in the middle of
wrangling the printer to get 7500 A5 leaflets for next Monday. Apple Macs
must be kept in business by printers! If anyone would like a few leaflets
to distribute in "interesting" places, please let us know.

Carole. 

==============================================================================
From: Dave Fisher <email address>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 1998 16:51:15 GMT
Subject: MV1173 Re: MV1172: MV Reception

> Date: Tue, 16 Jun 1998 14:31:41 +0100
> From: Carole Birkill <email address>
> Subject: MV Reception
> 
> If anyone would like a few leaflets
> to distribute in "interesting" places, please let us know.
> 
> Carole. 
> 

Carole

If you could send me one leaflet I can make copies to post around the 
wilds of Greenwich and beyond.

Dave Fisher
<postal address>
==============================================================================
From: Ian Chippett <email address>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 1998 12:46:49 EDT
Subject: MV1174 Re : MV1165; MV1163; MV1159; MV1157: Football - legitamate

Dear Steve (Reels)

Just kidding but one of the Voices is called Ian Wright and when someone of
that name starts writing to MV about a Certain Topical Sport one can be
forgiven for jumping to conclusions.

==============================================================================
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 1998 15:51:17 +0100
From: Roy Brown <email address>
Subject: MV1175: A mention of a mention of our heroes

Just got my Easter Term edition of CAM (the Cambridge Alumni Magazine),
in which Jonathan Sale, writing in the 'books' section, avers:

  Clive James reached Cambridge on, metaphorically speaking, the same
boat from Australia (as Germaine Greer), and the two compatriots are
fifty per cent of Once an Australian (Oxford University Press, 19.95);
Barry Humphries and art critic Robert Hughes make up the rest of the
quartet. Like Greer, James has chronicled his own life at length, though
he has generally gone for the sort of humorous exaggeration that is more
comfortable for the reader and less revealing of himself.

  Author Ian Britain (a deceptive name for a writer born in India and
teaching in Melbourne) points out the way in which James endears himself
to his public as a bit of a barbarian from Down Under, while making sure
his talents as a polymath are well flagged. He also pays tribute to the
thinking man's rock albums, made with fellow Footlighter Pete Atkin, of
which I possess the only complete set south of the Thames.

  James turns up again, this time in his own words, in a collection
published by his college to celebrate its 650th anniversary: Pembroke
Poets (6.00, including postage, from the College Office). Before alumni
of other colleges sneer that it must be a pretty slim volume, they
should please note that among the 50 bards quoted here are Edmund
Spenser, Thomas Gray, Christopher Smart and Ted Hughes.

 ... Clive James ... offers the drollest verse by an extant Pembroke
man, beginning: 'The book of my enemy has been remaindered/And I am
pleased'.

-- 
Roy Brown

==============================================================================
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 1998 15:36:09 +0100
From: Christine Guilfoyle <email address>
Subject: MV1176 Re: MV1150; MV1141: Cover versions

>Of course, if Clive had known Dusty (maybe he did) and written a song just
>for her, he might have been inspired to inject some sexual ambiguity
>into the standard romantic popular song form.  Could have been interesting.
>
It's not easy to see Pete and Clive as a kind of 1970s Pet Shop Boys,
but it's an intriguing image. 
-- 
Mike Walters

==============================================================================
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 1998 20:54:43 +0100
From: Christine Guilfoyle <email address>
Subject: MV1177 Re: MV1156; MV1146 Re: No, football, Steve Martland and Bootlegs

>I'm proud to say I'm under forty, have never heard of Stackridge, have had
>Secret Drinker for twenty years, am neither an academic nor work in
>computers and love football.  I'm still male but  have now put my name down
>for the operation.
>  
Having been at school with Andy, I think he's lying. He's heard of
Stackridge all right. (And even in the chess club I don't think we
really expected girls to be impressed by our Pete Atkin collections...)
-- 
Mike Walters

==============================================================================
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 1998 21:05:08 +0100
From: Christine Guilfoyle <email address>
Subject: MV1178 Re: MV1162: Various recent discussion points.

>Middlebrow is an expression I would almost guarantee that Clive doesn't
>approve of, but I use it to describe people like me who are too smart to
>read Harold Robbins or Jackie Collins, but aren't smart enough to read
>Tolstoy or Proust.
>
Quite right. In one of his critical books, he says it's a term that says
more about the person using it than it does abot the person being
described. So I guess it's okay to use it about yourself. 

By the way, I don't think you need to be smart to read Tolstoy or Proust
(in translation, anyway) - you just need a couple of spare years. 
-- 
Mike Walters

==============================================================================
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 1998 10:07:57 +0100
From: Roy Brown <email address>
Subject: MV1179 Re: MV1176; MV1150; MV1141: Dusty memories

>>Of course, if Clive had known Dusty (maybe he did) and written a song just
>>for her, he might have been inspired to inject some sexual ambiguity
>>into the standard romantic popular song form.  Could have been interesting.
>>
>It's not easy to see Pete and Clive as a kind of 1970s Pet Shop Boys,
>but it's an intriguing image. 

Pete:  Well, Clive, do you want the good news or the bad news?
Clive: Dunno, cobber. What's the good news?
Pete:  I've got this gig with Dusty.
Clive: That's great! But what's the bad news?
Pete:  It's Bin, not Springfield.....
-- 
Roy Brown

==============================================================================
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 1998 11:52:14 +0100
From: Roy Brown <email address>
Subject: MV1180 Re: MV1178 Midnight, or Midpoint, Voices?

>>Middlebrow is an expression I would almost guarantee that Clive doesn't
>>approve of, but I use it to describe people like me who are too smart to
>>read Harold Robbins or Jackie Collins, but aren't smart enough to read
>>Tolstoy or Proust.
>>
>Quite right. In one of his critical books, he says it's a term that says
>more about the person using it than it does abot the person being
>described. So I guess it's okay to use it about yourself. 
>
>By the way, I don't think you need to be smart to read Tolstoy or Proust
>(in translation, anyway) - you just need a couple of spare years. 

Meeting the spec almost exactly: (computers rather than academia),
divorced (but remarried - does that count?)

Of course, if you started with Clive and Pete when the LPs actually came
out, it must mean your life was on a pre-ordained track - that one day
you would be destined to 'walk away with all the love remaining' -
spooky! OTOH, it never mentioned the hail of saucepans... :{

But I wonder how we divide on being from the Science rather than the
Arts stream. Are we not widowers, but orphans, from the 'wrong' side of
C P Snow's Two Cultures?

And Clive's lyrics offer a handy glimpse of that other world - the spare
years we never had because we were heads-down over the stereoisomers and
the hydrogen bonding, the modes of shear and the Feynman diagrams?

But are there lots of BAs out there, nodding easily at the literary
references to coy mistresses and such, and yet in turn marvelling in the
M16s and the MTBs, the re-entry angles and airflows, from their side of
the divide?

Sydney Carter, folk singer (sort-of) of yore, wrote a song called
'Middle-aged, middle class, mediocre (it's just what I don't want to
be)'. Nice to think that MVs are keeping the third thing at bay, at
least.

(He also wrote a more famous song. Or, more accurately, he set some new
lyrics to the old Shaker hymn, 'Tis the gift to be simple', also used in
Aaron Copland's 'Appalachian Spring'. And look where that has gone to.
But you never see him credited. Shame).

-- 
Roy Brown

==============================================================================
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 1998 22:01:25 +0100
From: S J Birkill <email address>
Subject: MV1181: Buxton Publicity

Those of you with swanky printers might like to look at (with a view to
printing a few copies of) the HTML version of our Buxton publicity leaflet, at

http://www.rwt.co.uk/leaflet.htm

Resolution is intentionally limited to make for a speedy page load, but
printed at A5 or even A4 it's quite readable and not too pixellated, I think.

Please post in every unrecommended spot!

-- Steve

 PS: Don't tell me! I forgot to plug the SFM CD reissues .................
PPS: Anyone wanting copies of the professionally printed A5 version 
     (available Monday) please continue feeling free to ask! Richard 
     and Dave, thanks (says Carole), you'll receive yours next week.

==============================================================================
From: "andy & lynn" <email address>
Subject: MV1182: Flyers
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 1998 23:51:40 +0100

How about emailing the flyer.  It would save on postage and those who are 
interested can print and photocopy.  Surely that's what the Higher Education 
budget is for.  Its strange being the only mv who doesn't work in computers 
or at a university.  Fancy being the only one doing this at his own expense 
and in his own time.  I must get myself a life.
  
Andy

==============================================================================
From: "andy & lynn" <email address>
Subject: MV1183 Re: MV1176; MV1150; MV1141: Cover versions
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 1998 23:53:42 +0100

Surely Mike doesn't mean that Pete and Clive were named after an arcane
sexual practice!

Andy

==============================================================================
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 1998 17:40:03 -0600 (MDT)
From: Jeff Moss <email address>
Subject: MV1184 Re: MV1159; MV1157: Football - legitamate

Cary said:
>
>It's no good protesting about Football 'cause the more you protest, 
>the more you'll end up discussing it!! Thought I'd send this for the 
>football lovers and haters - legitimate 'cause it was written by 
>Clive James. This is his column from The Observer - 11th June, 1978. 
>You did say you didn't want to hear about "the current world cup" 
>Ian. 
>---------------------------------------------------------------------
>Chewing The Sporran


From one for whom getting the "Observer" would involve international travel,
and who has to set his alarm clock for 5.55am in order to watch the games,
thanks for putting up this wonderful article by Clive. Now if only he could
use that talent towards writing song lyrics......

Jeff Moss

==============================================================================
From: Ian Chippett <email address>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 1998 04:20:48 EDT
Subject: MV1185 Re : MV1182: Flyers

It's true that not all of us work in computers or teaching. I understand that
one of us works in radio...

Ian C

==============================================================================
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 1998 10:54:15 +0100
From: Lesley Hodges <email address>
Subject: MV1186 Re: MV1185; MV1182: Flyers

> From: <email address>
> Date: Fri, 19 Jun 1998 04:20:48 EDT
> Subject: Re : MV1182: Flyers
> 
> It's true that not all of us work in computers or teaching. I understand
> that one of us works in radio...
> 
> Ian C

I don't even work anymore Lesley

==============================================================================
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 1998 16:58:35 +0000
From: Stephen Payne <email address>
Subject: MV1187: Covers: Pete and Randy

I suspect this musing may be controversial, but not to worry.

I'm surprised Pete doesn't fancy singing any Randy Newman songs.  In my
naive space of songwriters, RN is the closest to PA/CJ.   If I try hard
enough I can almost imagine (just a few) PA/CJ songs as being RN songs  and
vice versa ( especially RN's earlier and to my mind better songs, though I
have to suppress the very American feel of much of RN and the erudite feel
of much of  PA/CJ).    Among the RN songs I can hear Pete doing in my
mind's ear and that I feel PA/CJ almost could have written  are Simon
Smith, So Hard Living Without You (not sure I'm remembering the title
right), Foreign Policy, I Think Its Going to Rain Today and Moma Told Me
Not to Come.  And I think RN would do a good job of Master of the Revels,
to name but one.

And in an echo of Live Libel, I once heard RN do an effortless  parody of a
generic Elton John song, and I bet Pete could turn that trick too?

Finally, in partial support of my thought, I think I remember reading RN
describing his fans as "college professors and/or ex acid-heads";  wonder
if that adds a new feature to our Voices stereotype?

S

==============================================================================
From: Cary <email address>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 1998 22:41:12 +0000
Subject: MV1188 Re: MV1185; MV1182: Flyers

Ian used these well put words,

> It's true that not all of us work in computers or
> teaching. I understand that one of us works in radio...

 Hm, I wonder if whoever that is will be printing his own flyers?? 

Cary
wasting time at home because I don't have a computer to waste it on 
at work .....
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~        
ROCK FOLLIES - The Classic 1970's TV Drama starring 
Julie Covington, Charlotte Cornwell and Rula Lenska. 
Online at:-  http://members.xoom.com/Follies
Pictures,sounds and much more (unofficial site)
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Regards - Cary (like Mary with a 'C' for cat)

==============================================================================
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 1998 19:55:07 +0100
From: Leslie Moss <email address>
Subject: MV1189 Re: MV1187: Covers: Pete and Randy

At 18:44 19/06/98 +0100, you wrote:
>Date: Fri, 19 Jun 1998 16:58:35 +0000
>From: Stephen Payne <email address>

>Finally, in partial support of my thought, I think I remember reading RN
>describing his fans as "college professors and/or ex acid-heads";  wonder
>if that adds a new feature to our Voices stereotype?
>
>S

Personally, I'm flattered to be considered either! Neither am I in (as
opposed to into) computers, or academia. However, I suspect that many of us
had more in common in the early seventies than we do now. I'd be interested
to know how we each encountered Pete and Clive's music, or Pete in person. I
know from reading MV that several of you were personal friends of Pete in
the Cambrdieg days but what about the rest of us?

I was introduced to BOTBS shortly after it came out, by a guitar-playing
friend by the name of Richard Joseph (are you out there Ricky?). This was
before I went up to Cambridge myself to study Maths, and saw Pete live at
the Corn Exchange on at least two occasions if my memory serves me well. I
wonder if any of you were in the audience?

Leslie

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